Student jobs: teaching among the greats

The festive season and beginning of the new year can be an expensive time, with lots of celebrating, buying gifts and going out. Who doesn’t want to start the new year with a more practical approach to their finances?

Now is the perfect time to think about finding a new job and earning some money. Having a job can also give you a chance to make new friends and contacts, try something different, and get some all-important work experience.

Here are some of the more attractive options available to students, including opportunities to teach where some of the greatest teachers of all time have taught before.

 

  1. Working at your university

Universities often have jobs available for students all through the year. How about working as a library assistant in one of the many libraries at your university? There are over 100 libraries at Oxford University for example, so if you are at a large university you can take your pick! In the summer months, Cambridge University hosts international summer programmes for mature students with hundreds of courses, seminars, lectures and talks. Getting a job helping out with these could be an interesting opportunity you might want to consider.

 

  1. Taking a punt

Perhaps you would prefer to work outside and get some fresh air. What about working on a river cruise boat in the capital? London has 30 million tourists a year and many of them take in the sights of London from a boat on the Thames. There are opportunities to work as a river tour guide in smaller towns as well, where tourists take to the river to the see the peaceful waters, trees and wildlife.  You could be punting tourists up and down the River Cam in Cambridge or the River Avon which runs through Bath and Salisbury. In all of these places, you would get to hang out in nature and get paid at the same time. You could spend time in the great outdoors and get fit punting for up to 10 miles a day.

  1. Teaching the subject you love

Or how about becoming a tutor and sharing your passion for your subject with others? If you’ve considered teaching or lecturing as a career but were not sure how to get into it, this can be a great way to get the work experience you need. During July and August, many tutors and PhD or post graduate students can often be found building their teaching skills for their CV while earning, by working for one of the many organisations that run international study programmes in the top UK universities over the summer months. Oxford Summer Courses is one of the best (full disclosure – I have been known to teach for them in my time) as they allow you to design your own courses around the parts of your subject that you love the most, and offer good rates of pay. But there are many others too. Just Google university summer courses for a good selection.

The great thing about these courses is that you get teaching experience on your CV – an essential for an academic career – but you could also get the chance to teach in impressive historic spaces. Imagine holding your lessons in the same rooms where Sir Stephen Hawking was once a scholar at Cambridge University – talk about teaching among the greats.

 

If you’d like to read more about any of these opportunities, have a look at these links:

https://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/about/jobs

https://www.scudamores.com/jobs

https://oxfordsummercourses.com/tutor-opportunities/


Dr Simon Mullen read Pure Maths at Leeds University before completing a PhD in Maths. He is now a private tutor and can often be found teaching for Oxford Summer Courses in the summer months.

 

The following two tabs change content below.

Molly Hare

Molly Hare // Student Wire Magazine Editor // PR and Journalism student at Leeds Beckett // Book worm, cocktail connoisseur, gherkin fanatic //

You Might Also Like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.